Sound and fire = complicated!

The Rubens Tube is a really complicated demo that seems simple. Once you start thinking about it you realise that sound antinodes are points of oscillating pressure, so the flames shouldn’t be stable peaks – they should be going up and down at the frequency of the wave!

And if you change the gas pressure a lot the nodes and antinodes reverse position! Wish I’d thought these points through before Derek asked me to film this!

 

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Using antimatter to find weirdo supernovae

Fiona Panther is searching out galaxy for antimatter – no it’s not science fiction, she’s after anti – electrons, called positrons. It’ll help her to study supernovae – exploding stars.

Fi is a PhD student at ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt Stromlo.

Filmed at Physics in the Pub, 2016, Smith’s Alternative. Supported by Australian Institute of Physics and National Science Week.

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How to study Astronomy with a balloon

We know PhD students like to do things on the cheap… well Ryan Ridden-Harper is doing high altitude astronomy – like the Hubble space telescope – but with no expensive satellite, just a weather balloon. He hopes it will give nice cheap insights into dark energy!

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Gravitational Waves – behind the scenes

I had the honour to interview David Reitze, one of the leaders in gravitational wave physics, when he visited Canberra earlier this year.

Bit surprised he wasn’t one of the Nobel laureates… but anyway, ahead of the exciting announcement tomorrow, (what have they found this time?!),  here’s the interview.

 

And for those who just want the highlights:

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