Would you let me put drugs in your brain?

The amazing Dr Kiara Bruggeman gets all Dr Seuss with her rhyme about her PhD research to develop a bandaid for the brain. Previously she won FameLab people’s choice award with this piece.


Filmed at Health and Medical in the Pub at Smiths Alternative in Canberra. Supported by National Science Week ACT, ANU Medical School, Australian Society for Medical Research.


Who F&*%ed up the planet?

My cover of the amazing Katie Noonan’s song about sustainability and responsibility.  ##LANGUAGE WARNING##


The original is here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdn3O6aaMNc


A new diet to save the planet

In August I did a course in Sustainable Stand Up with the marvellous Belina Raffy. Here’s the result. Inappropriate thoughts and bad fart jokes. but we all gotta start somewhere… 🙂


The nano-satellite revolution

Professor Rod Boswell from ANU shows off a nanosatellite and explains how they are revolutionising the space industry.


Faraday Cage: using a foil Twisties packet to hide from your boss

There’s been a lot of news about the electrician who got busted hiding his phone/PDA in a foil Twisties packet to prevent his company from tracking him… so he could go play golf.

So I decided to give it a whirl, in some chocolate wrapper. And then try out the microwave. but that wasn’t so successful!



How a guitar steals energy from the future

From Physics in the Pub 2016, a great set from Leon Twardy about sound waves, how microphones work, and how an acoustic guitar steals energy from the future.


Sound and fire = complicated!

The Rubens Tube is a really complicated demo that seems simple. Once you start thinking about it you realise that sound antinodes are points of oscillating pressure, so the flames shouldn’t be stable peaks – they should be going up and down at the frequency of the wave!

And if you change the gas pressure a lot the nodes and antinodes reverse position! Wish I’d thought these points through before Derek asked me to film this!



Using antimatter to find weirdo supernovae

Fiona Panther is searching out galaxy for antimatter – no it’s not science fiction, she’s after anti – electrons, called positrons. It’ll help her to study supernovae – exploding stars.

Fi is a PhD student at ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Mt Stromlo.

Filmed at Physics in the Pub, 2016, Smith’s Alternative. Supported by Australian Institute of Physics and National Science Week.


How to study Astronomy with a balloon

We know PhD students like to do things on the cheap… well Ryan Ridden-Harper is doing high altitude astronomy – like the Hubble space telescope – but with no expensive satellite, just a weather balloon. He hopes it will give nice cheap insights into dark energy!